Name index to Chancery inquisitions post mortem, Henry V-Richard III

(C 138-C 142) by Great Britain. Court of Chancery

Publisher: List and Index Society, Public Record Office in Kew, Richmond [England]

Written in English
Published: Downloads: 348
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Subjects:

  • Great Britain. -- Public Record Office -- Indexes,
  • Inquisitiones post mortem -- Great Britain -- Indexes,
  • Great Britain -- History -- Sources -- Indexes

Edition Notes

Other titlesIndex to Chancery inquisitions post mortem, Henry V-Richard III, Chancery inquisitions post mortem, Henry V-Richard III
SeriesList & Index Society (Series) -- v. 269
The Physical Object
Pagination1 v. (unpaged) ;
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL15230527M

Court of Chancery: Inquisitions post mortem relating to Yorkshire, of the reigns of Henry IV and Henry V. (n.p. Printed for the Society, ), ed. by John William Clay and W. Paley Baildon (page images at HathiTrust; US access only).   Actually we know from heraldic and property inheritance that Willelma Fulford was a Morton/Moreton of Cornwall. We know from available inquisitions post mortem that her father was either Nicholas Morton or John [no surname], son of Joan Fitz Urse. We also know from Willelma's own statement that Sir Ralph Fitz Urse was her great-grandfather.   Name and age of his heir, which would be accurate if under age but may not be for majors, see the interesting example given by Norman Hidden (Legal Age in Inquisitions Post Mortem. Genealogists’ Magazine Vol 22 #6, page ). IPMs are in Latin in a standard layout and all have been indexed and many translated. Inquisitions post mortem Y.A.S. Vol LIX. Richard Dunford at York. Inquisitions post mortem Y.A.S. Vol LIX. John Dunsford was appointed vicar of Stainton 30 miles from York,in what was then the West Riding of Yorkshire, and now in South Yorkshire. Richard Dunford at York. Inquisitions post mortem Y.A.S. Vol LIX. /8 Henry Dunsford.

Inquisition Post Mortem testimony separated out the estates that were held by Margaret de Mortimer as dower from her previous marriage to Geoffrey de Cornewaille. Devereux also held for life a lease of the mill of Frome from the Prior and Canons of St. Leonards of Pyon, and . iii. Theopholis Hutchinson, born Bef. Septem in Alford, Lincolnshire, England. The records of the Beeford Manor Court show that the Will of Henry Dryver was proved in before William Thomson, clerk, and John Carleton, steward of said Court, the inventory indicating a debt of (Chancery Inquisitions Post Mortem, Series II.   There is no satisfactory pedigree of the Routh family in print, although the earliest part is shown in the Chronicle of Meaux, and there is a short and somewhat incorrect pedigree of the family in the 15 th century, in Flower’s Visitation of Yorkshire. [1] The main line of the Routh of Routh family came to an end with the death of Brian Routh in

Name index to Chancery inquisitions post mortem, Henry V-Richard III by Great Britain. Court of Chancery Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Name index to Chancery inquisitions post mortem, Henry V-Richard III: (C C ). [Great Britain. Court of Chancery.]. Get this from a library. Name index to Chancery inquisitions post mortem, Henry V-Richard III: C C [List & Index Society.; Great Britain. Public Record Office.;].Name index to Chancery inquisitions post mortem, Henry V-Richard III: C C List & Index Society Kew, Richmond [England] Wikipedia Citation Please see Wikipedia's template documentation for further citation fields Henry V-Richard III book may be required.

Name index to Chancery inquisitions post mortem, Henry V-Richard III: C C ; Post mortem: essays, historical and medical / C. Maclaurin; Calendar of inquisitions post mortem and other analogous documents preserved in the Public Record Office.

Each file is usually made up of the documentation of inquisitions post mortem following the deaths of about twenty persons. The actual number of inquisitions in each file is likely to be rather greater than twenty, given that a tenant might well have held lands in more than one county, in which case separate inquisitions were required to be conducted in each shire concerned.

Details of C ; Reference: C Title: Chancery: Inquisitions Post Mortem, Series I, Henry III Description: Inquisitions conducted before juries and normally presided over by a local Henry V-Richard III book official (a sheriff in most cases until the mids, but from the later years of Henry III.

Inquisitions post mortem (sometimes known as escheats) are among the most 'genealogist-friendly' of records, and were a mainstay of traditional medieval genealogy. These were inquiries, undertaken after the death of a feudal tenant in chief (that is, a direct tenant of the crown), to establish what lands were held and who should succeed to them.

An illustration of an open book. Books. An illustration of two cells of a film strip. Video An illustration of an audio speaker. Notes of post mortem inquisitions taken in Sussex. 1 Henry VII, to and after. Abstracted and translated by F.W.T. Attree Notes of post mortem inquisitions taken in Sussex.

1 Henry VII, to and after. Chancery: Inquisitions post mortem, series I, Richard III --C Chancery: Inquisitions post mortem, series II, and other inquistions, Henry VII to Charles I.

Series Title: List & Index Society (Series), v. Other Titles: Inquisitions post mortem, Henry V-Richard III Inquisitions ad quod damnum Miscellaneous inquisitions, Henry VII-Charles I. Calendar of Inquisitions Post Mortem: Vol Henry V.

Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, This free content was digitised using optical character recognition and sponsored by the AHRC-funded 'Mapping the Medieval Countryside' project of the University of Winchester and King's College London.

All rights. Get this from a library. Lists of inquisitions post mortem, Henry V-Richard III ; Inquisitions ad quod damnum and miscellaneous inquisitions, Henry VII-Charles I: (C C ). [Great Britain.

Court of Chancery.] -- Inquisitions authorized by Chancery writ and preserved in the Public Record Office. The Richard III Society has most generously agreed to a large grant that makes it possible to calendar the inquisitions post mortem for Richard III ().

The existing calendars run frombut with a large gap from including the Wars of the Roses that needs to be filled. From CHES 3. Inquisitions post mortem and other inquisitions, with associated documents. Alphabetical index of names. (25th Annual Report of the Deputy Keeper of the Public Records, Appendix, p.

32; ) Cornwall and Devon: Edward Alexander Fry, A Calendar of Inquisitiones Post Mortem for Cornwall and Devon from Henry III to Charles I. ( An illustration of an open book. Books. An illustration of two cells of a film strip.

Video. An illustration of an audio speaker. Audio An illustration of a " floppy disk. Full text of "A calendar of inquistiones post mortem for Cornwall and Devon, from Henry III to Charles I ()". Inquisitions Post Mortem, Henry VII, Appendix IV.

It is clear from a comparison of the ancient MS. index to the Chancery inquisitions of the reign of Henry VII (P.R.O. Index ) with the series of inquisitions as it now exists that many inquisitions have been lost since the index was of these were lost after the compilation of the index but before the inquisitions were.

Inquisitions Post Mortem, Henry VII, Appendix II: A few inquisitions “post mortem” and analogous documents, which were missing from the Chancery series of inquisitions at the time of the preparation of the foregoing Calendar, have since been re-discovered and assigned to.

INQUISITIONS OF THE REIGN OF KING HENRY THE EIGHTH. William Coope, Esquire. Inquisition taken at the Guildhall 15 June, 5 Henry VIII [], before Richard Haddon, knight, Mayor and Escheator, after the death of William Coope, esq., by the oath of Robert Bardesley, Philip Cowper, John Herdman, William Burton, Thomas Gybbons, Oliver Holyngbryg, Richard Lynde, Thomas Pykkyll, Henry.

Calendar of Inquisitions Miscellaneous (Chancery), Henry III–Henry V, 8 vols (London: HMSO, –) Calendar of Inquisitions post mortem and Other Analogous Documents Preserved in the Public Record Office, 26 vols (vols i–xxi: London: HMSO, –95; vols xxii.

An illustration of an open book. Books. An illustration of two cells of a film strip. Video. An illustration of an audio speaker. Audio. An illustration of a " floppy disk. Full text of "Abstracts of Wiltshire Inquisitions Post Mortem, Returned Into the Court of Chancery.".

Red Book of Scotland; Search, Browse & Buy. Ebook Store; Search titles and texts Calendar of Inquisitions Post Mortem, Henry III, volume 1 (), pp: $ Add: $ Abstracts of Inquisitiones Post Mortem relating to the City of London returned into the Court of Chancery during the Tudor period, volume 1 ( Includes index 1/ to Inquisitions post mortem or Escheats for Henry VII to Charles II.

Contains the Public Record Office class no. C Index arranged by the first letter of the deceased's surname. theyorkshire archaeologicalsociety- founded incorporated recordseries, fortheyear inquisitionspostmortem relatingtoyorkshire, ofthe. Henry VII. ABSTRACTS of the Inquisitiones Post Mortem.

relatin to the. CITY OF LONDON, RETURNED INTO THE HIGH COURT OF CHANCERY. INQUISITIONS OF THE REIGN OF KING HENRY THE SEVENTH. Katherine Stafford. The calendar records an inquisition of Katherine, late wife of Humphrey Stafford, in the second year of Henry VII, but it does not appear to be. Early Record Commission volumes dealt with inquisitions from Henry III to Richard III, but were more a catalogue of landholders and places than a true calendar; documents from to were then calendared in detail by the Public Record Office, as were those for –, leaving a large gap.

An Inquisition post mortem (abbreviated to Inq.p.m. or i.p.m., and formerly known as an escheat) (Latin, meaning "(inquisition) after death") is an English medieval record of the death, estate and heir of one of the king's tenants-in-chief, made for royal fiscal process of making such inquisition was effected by the royal escheators in each county where the deceased held land.

On the deficiencies of these, see CIPM I, –ix and Inquisitions Post Mortem, Henry V–Richard III, pp.3–4. Note that the latter improves on the Record Commissioners’ volumes by providing an up-to-date list and is supplemented by Names Index to Inquisitions Post Mortem, Henry V–Richard III, List and Index Society, ( The inquisition post mortem of Sir Thomas Haute, which is lost, was held in the 18th year of King Henry VII (/03).

A Chancery suit (brought by Isabella) of May to January /18 shows that Thomas and Isabella had two sons (William and Herry) and five daughters (Jane, Margery, Agnes, Elizabeth and Alice), and supplies other useful.

Gloucestershire Inquisitions Post mortem, Henry III, selective index number in the Chancery Series of inquisitions at the Public Record Office and the page number in the Record Society book.

The editor noted that plans were in place in for an index of names and places once all the inquisitions from the reign of Henry III to Edward III. "Inquisitiones post mortem" were concerned only with the property held "in chief" by the deceased.

The original documents are in Latin. This book contains abstracts written in English. by George S. Fry and Edw. Alex. Fry. Lists of Inquisitions post mortem, Henry V-Richard III; Inquisitions ad quod damnum and miscellaneous inquisitions, Henry VII-Charles I (CC) (List and Index Society ; Kew, ) The lists give the name, year and county for each inquisition post mortem; for the other inquisitions there is a brief note as to the subject.

See English Regnal Years for the years Kings and Queens reigned. See Index to C Series Extractions from Public Records Office (PRO) Catalogue, Chancery: Inquisitions Post Mortem, Series II, and other Inquisitions, Henry VII to Charles I [] (C); and Inquisitions Ad Quod Damnum, Henry III to Richard III [28 Oct - 22 Aug ] (C ).The Inquisitions Post Mortem were surveys undertaken by the court of chancery or exchequer at the time of death of the landholder.

The earliest start in but there is a notable gap between the reign of Henry VI and c. the s. The resumption indicates an administrative revival of .No record of the suit has been found, but the Year Book tells us that it was in Chancery (and in February John III gave an undertaking in Chancery to appear at the next Lancaster assizes to give security for keeping the peace toward William Radclyf esquire; CCR).

The hearing recorded in the Year Book was in the Exchequer.